SP-600


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I had to refinish the front panel. It was pretty beat-up with some rust on the bezels. I used a darker grey so the engraving and the dials stand out better. I did not repaint the knobs. I did de-oxidize them and polish them. I did not try to repaint the meter. I was worried that some paint would get into the mechanism. I also did not replace the dial overlays, so they are a bit yellow with age, but are otherwise legible (the replacements are flat, whereas the originals have raised markings).

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I did wash and scrub the sheet metal, but I did not try to polish it to a mirror shine. No steel wool was used in the process. De-Oxit was applied to all the tube sockets.

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This is where I spent most of my time: the RF deck. All the caps were replaced with 600V ceramic. A number of resistors were replaced as well. I used a lot of shrink-tubing on the leads to prevent shorts but still allow you to get a tool in to align it. A number of wires were replaced. The caps were dressed to hug the ground plane wherever possible.

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This shows the recapping job on the IF and AF sections. All the orange items are 600V SBE (née Sprague) "Orange-Drop" 716P capacitors. A number of resistors had to be replaced in this area as well. You can see the rebuilt power section on the right.

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Close-up of the IF and AF sections. A fair amount of hardware was replaced by stainless in this area.

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This is the rebuilt power section. I had to replace L1 (the 20-Henry choke), since the original was open. I replaced the electrolytic with 47-uf, 450-V special high-ripple tolerant, long-life, electrolytics. You should be able to pass this one down to your grand-children.

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All the miniature tubes have the IERC heat-sheding shields. These are the only tube shields known to actually increase tube life.

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